Spring cleansing

When the weather warms up and the flowers start to bloom, it’s time for spring cleaning, or spring cleansing. We can finally open the windows and start dusting what has settled over the winter. Along with cleaning the house and swapping out my winter clothes for shorts and T-shirts, I want to be sure I cleanse my body, too.

We live in a toxic environment and our bodies are bombarded with chemicals and other potentially harmful substances on a daily basis. Toxins are found in the food we eat, the air we breathe, and the water we drink. They can also be found in commercially packaged products we buy and probably use every day. These toxins are causing us to be ill.

How do I know if I need to detox?

The following signs may indicate toxic overload in the body. If you suffer from any of these on a regular basis, you might try cleansing and see if they disappear.

  • Low energy
  • Constipation
  • Mental fog or trouble focusing
  • Having trouble losing weight
  • Intestinal or digestive upset

How do toxins enter the body?

Toxins enter the body through inhalation, through our gastrointestinal tract and through our skin.

Things like painting the house, varnishing the furniture, bringing home new furniture, dry cleaning, and cooking are all sources of many indoor air pollutants. Household cleaning products and toiletries contribute to indoor air toxins. We end up inhaling these toxins or absorbing them through our skin. Things like chemicals used in agriculture, fumes, air pollution and many other factors contribute to internal toxins. Consider using natural cleaning products or homemade remedies for cleaning the house.

When we drink caffeine and alcohol, we are ingesting toxins. When we eat bread, cheese and processed meat, we are ingesting salt, saturated fats, chemicals, hormones and antibiotics that all put a strain on the liver. These things can also cause high blood pressure, bloating and kidney problems. Medications, food additives, preservatives, food colorings, sweeteners and flavor enhancers contribute to internal toxins as well.

Detox naturally with HealthTrim® Cleanse.

A CORE4 product, HealthTrim Cleanse is a gentle, natural, non-fasting way to remove harmful toxins from the body through the seven channels of elimination: Blood, Colon, Kidney, Liver, Lung, Lymph, and Skin.

HealthTrim Cleanse includes unique ingredients that support each channel:

  • Blood is supported by Burdock (root), Red Clover (herb), and Dandelion (root & leaf).
  • Colon is supported by Cascara Sagrada (Bark), and Aloe Vera (leaf)
  • Kidney is supported by Dandelion (root & leaf)
  • Liver is supported by milk thistle (seed), artichoke (leaf), and garlic (bulb)
  • Lymph is supported by oregano oil
  • And finally, Skin is supported by dandelion (root & leaf) and green tea (leaf)

HealthTrim Cleanse also helps you meet and/or maintain your weight loss goals. You might be surprised with how much waste you have in your intestines. HealthTrim Cleanse supports clearing out your intestines. HealthTrim Cleanse supports the elimination of these toxins from the body, promoting digestive health while maintaining normal intestinal microflora.

In addition to supplementing with HealthTrim Cleanse, be sure to eat a healthy diet, get regular cardiovascular exercise, hydrate with water, and eliminate alcohol, coffee, cigarettes, refined sugars and saturated fats, and increase digestive enzymes by eating fruits and vegetables.

Eating leafy greens and sprouted foods may help cleanse your body. Leafy greens, such as arugula, bok choy, endive, kale, lettuce, mustard greens, cabbage, spinach, Swiss chard and wild greens contain vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and chlorophyll, which help purify the blood and organs. Bulking up your diet with these foods can help your body. Consider adding several of these to your daily regimen to help create better health and vitality.

Ready for a clean sweep?

Get started on your journey to Whole Health today!

 

Winter and weight loss go hand in hand

exercisewinter_0217Weight loss in the winter may seem like a misstatement. After all, hearty casseroles and stews always hit the spot as you warm your toes by the fire. But winter can be an ideal time to shed extra pounds when you exercise and make Whole Health part of your lifestyle.

Let the temperatures do the training

Get outside and play in the snow. You may be tempted to stay indoors to exercise on your stationary bike, but exercising in the cold can jump-start your metabolism which causes your body to burn more calories. Run or walk in the afternoon, being cautious of wet and icy patches. Studies have shown that we expend five times more energy when shivering, compared to when we are resting.1

Benefits to exercising outside during the winter

  • You’ll burn more calories. As the body works harder to regulate its core temperature, you’ll burn more calories during your wintry workout compared to exercising indoors.
  • You’ll make your heart muscle stronger. Cold weather makes the heart work harder which isn’t necessarily good for someone with heart trouble. But, regular exercise in colder weather can make the heart stronger, better preparing the body for more strenuous workouts in the future.
  • You’ll drink more water. You can still get dehydrated in the wintertime, so drink plenty of water before, during and after your workout. You may not feel it, but you still sweat when it’s cold outside; it just evaporates quicker in dry, chilly air.
  • You’ll get your vitamin D. Yes, even in the wintertime. But remember, too, that you still need to apply sunscreen.
  • You’ll feel more energized. Cold air is stimulating and can boost your mood. As the body works harder to stay warm, the amount of endorphins increases.
  • You’ll lessen your chances of the winter blues. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may be caused by lack of sun, activity and proper nutrition.3

Replace that hot chocolate with a fresh cup of PURE Café. You’ll suppress your appetite so you can limit the amount of calories you are eating throughout the day.

Dress appropriately. Wear water-resistant clothes and dress in layers so you can take pieces off as you get hot. Your body loses a lot of heat from your head, so a hat is a must, as are gloves. If you are into winter sports, cross-country skiing and ice skating burn the most calories.2

This infographic lists calories burned by Olympic winter sports activities. Find a friend or neighbor to run or walk with and be sure to create a goal. For instance, commit to 20 minutes of exercise three times a week. Use an app on your phone. There are many fitness apps, from calorie counters, to distance trackers, and more.

Make exercise a priority in the winter so you stay fit and healthy year ‘round. Always talk with your healthcare provider before starting an exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you choose is safe for you.

1http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/fulltext/S1043-2760(14)00010-1

2http://calorielab.com/burned/?mo=se&gr=19&ti=winter+activities&q=&wt=150&un=lb&kg=68

3http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/seasonal-affective-disorder/basics/causes/con-20021047

The Dietary Guidelines are out for 2015-2020

DietaryGuidelines_0116 Every five years, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) jointly release a list of guidelines to follow for a healthy diet.1 Following these tips from the USDA can help support your weight-loss and healthy eating goals.

Eat less sugar, meat and sodium.

Healthy diets should limit saturated fats and trans fats, added sugars and sodium. They should also include fruits (especially whole fruits), vegetables, protein, dairy, grains and oils. The dietary guidelines do not talk about limiting sodas and other sugary drinks, but they suggest limiting sugars and saturated fats to 10 percent of total calories, and sodium to 2,300 mg per day. For a 2,000-calorie diet means: 200 calories of sugar and 200 calories of fat. Learn more at heart.org and http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/executive-summary/.

Be aware of the sources of sodium in your diet. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 40 percent of our daily sodium comes from 10 types of food, some of which do not taste salty. These foods include cured meats and cold cuts, poultry, pizza, soups, cheese, meat dishes, snacks, rolls and bread, and pasta dishes (with the exception of macaroni and cheese).2 It is also common to consume sodium from salad dressings, canned foods, condiments, boxed mixes, bottled marinades and sauces, frozen dinners, some ready-to-eat cereals and cheeses.3 In just one meal, a sandwich with deli meat, pickle relish and other toppings, it is possible to get over 1,500 mg of sodium.

Follow healthy eating patterns.

The guidelines also suggest that we follow a healthy eating pattern our entire life 1

  • Consume a variety of nutrient dense foods:
    • Eat dark green, yellow, purple, red, white, and orange fruits/vegetables
    • Incorporate whole fruits and grains
    • Have a variety of fat-free/low-fat dairy including milk, yogurt, and cheese, and/or fortified soy beverages
    • Vary your protein sources (lean poultry and meats, eggs, seafood, legumes, seeds, nuts, and soy products)
  • Consume healthy oils
  • Control portion sizes
  • Consume healthier food/beverages

Increase activity level.

Americans need to be more physically active. Being inactive means there is no activity beyond those of daily living (ADLs).

  • Per week, adults should have a minimum of:
    • 150 minutes of low-intensity physical activity (casual walking, stretching, slow dancing, fishing, light yard work)
    • 150-300 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity (brisk walking, yoga, jumping on a trampoline, weight training, volleyball, tennis, canoeing, horseback riding).
    • 300 + minutes of high-intensity physical activity (running, jogging, step aerobics, jumping rope, boxing, swimming laps, skiing)
  • Being physically active can:
    • Help maintain a healthy body weight
    • May improve bone health when weight-bearing exercises are incorporated
  • If you have been inactive, gradually build your level of activity.4 It may be advisable to check with your health care provider to find out how much and what level of physical activity is appropriate for you.

Make a plan and track your progress.

Products by PURE

Many of our products, like Daily Build and Coral Calcium, help supplement your vitamin and mineral requirements, in addition to fruits and vegetables. Superfruits are a wonderful source of antioxidants, such as Mangosteen, Noni, Acai and Goji. Additional fiber and omega-3 fatty acids can be found in Mila. Don’t forget about ENERGY for pre-workout hydration or Hydration for post-workout hydration. The HealthTrim® line can supplement your diet as part of your daily calories and can help with weight management.

 

1(Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020, 8th Ed., online http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/?platform=hootsuite). According to the executive summary for the dietary guidelines (Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020. Executive Summary. Online http://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/executive-summary/)

2 (Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Last updated and reviewed August 21, 2014. Accessed from http://www.cdc.gov/salt/sources.htm. Accessed on January 25, 2016).

3(Keller, M. Seasonings of change. Today’s Dietitian. Oct 2009; 11: 10 (40) Accessed on January 25, 2016. Accessed from http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/100509p40.shtml)

4(Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, health.gov. Chapter 1: Introducing the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Last updated: January 25, 2016. Accessed on January 25, 2016. Accessed from http://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/chapter1.aspx).